CHELSEA


Chelsea



Contemporary art galleries, elevated park spaces, and stylish everything near the heart of Manhattan.

Uptown affluence and downtown style come together in Chelsea. Cutting-edge art galleries and gay-friendly bars mingle with sought-after high-rises and converted warehouses in this ultra-fashionable, and ultra busy, neighborhood. Chelsea’s world-class architecture, fine dining establishments, and hip nightlife scene contribute to its first-rate reputation.

Chelsea is within Manhattan and bordered by Midtown, Hell's Kitchen, West Village, Greenwich Village, Flatiron District, Meatpacking District, and Union Square


LaGuardia Airport: 25 minutes by cab without traffic
JFK Airport: 35 minutes by cab without traffic
Times Square: 15 minutes by subway
Wall Street / Financial District: 21 minutes by subway


Education




The Chelsea School





The Bayard Rustin Educational Complex in 1931, when it was Textile High School


There are numerous public schools in Chelsea, including Public School 11, also known as the William T. Harris School; P.S. 33, the Chelsea School; the O. Henry School (Intermediate School 70); Liberty High School For Newcomers; Lab School; the Museum School; and the Bayard Rustin Educational Complex, which houses six small schools.
The Bayard Rustin Educational Complex was founded as Textile High School in 1930, later renamed to Straubenmuller Textile High School, then Charles Evans Hughes High School. In the 1990s, it was renamed the Bayard Rustin High School for the Humanities after civil rights activist Bayard Rustin.

The high school closed in 2012 after a grading scandal, but the building had already started being used as a "vertical campus" housing multiple small schools. Quest to Learn, Hudson High School of Learning Technologies, Humanities Preparatory Academy, James Baldwin School, Landmark High School, and Manhattan Business Academy are the six constituent schools in the complex.

Private schools in the neighborhood include Avenues: The World School, a K-12 school; and the Catholic Xavier High School, a secondary school.

Chelsea is also home to the Fashion Institute of Technology, a specialized SUNY unit that serves as a training ground for the city's fashion and design industries. The School of Visual Arts, a for-profit art school and the public High School of Fashion Industries also have a presence in the design fields.


The neighborhood is also home to the General Theological Seminary of the Episcopal Church, the oldest seminary in the Anglican Communion. The Center for Jewish History, a consortium of several national research organizations, is a unified library, exhibition, conference, lecture, and performance venue, located on 17th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues.



Transportation


The neighborhood is reachable by the M7, M10, M11, M12, M14, M23 New York City Bus routes. New York City Subway routes include the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line's 1 2 services, the IND Eighth Avenue Line's A C E services, and the IND Sixth Avenue Line's F M services. The 34th Street – Hudson Yards station on the IRT Flushing Line (7 <7> trains) opened in September 2015 with its main entrance in Chelsea.



HUDSON YARDS


Hudson Yards


Hudson Yards is a large-scale redevelopment project that is jointly planned, funded and constructed by the City of New York, the State of New York, and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to encourage development along the Hudson River in Manhattan, New York City. The project includes a rezoning of the Far West Side, an extension of the New York City Subway's 7 <7> trains to the area's eponymous subway station at 11th Avenue, and a renovation of the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center.

The centerpiece of Hudson Yards is a 28-acre (11 ha) mixed-use real estate development of the same name by Related Companies and Oxford Properties, currently being constructed over the West Side Rail Yard. This new construction project is the largest of its kind. According to its master plan, created by Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, Hudson Yards is expected to consist of 16 skyscrapers containing more than 12,700,000 square feet (1,180,000 m2) of new office, residential, and retail space.

Among its components will be six million square feet (560,000 m2) of commercial office space, a 750,000-square-foot (70,000 m2) retail center with two levels of restaurants, cafes, markets and bars, a hotel, a cultural space, about 5,000 residences, a 750-seat school, and 14 acres (5.7 ha) of public open space.

The rail yard development was planned after the city lost its bid for the 2012 Summer Olympics following the state's refusal to approve the proposed West Side Stadium for the New York Jets over the MTA's West Side Yard. Hudson Yards broke ground on December 4, 2012; the first tower, an 895-foot (273 m) office building in the southeast corner of the site, opened on May 31, 2016. The over-US$20 billion development will accommodate a projected 65,000 daily visitors when completed.



Subway extension


The new subway station in September 2015.


After the Hudson Yards project was approved in 2005, the MTA received proceeds from the initial 2006 bond offering to pay for the subway to 34th Street. With funding assured, the MTA proceeded quickly to construction. The subway extension opened on September 13, 2015, and connects to nearby buildings and developments, including 30 Hudson Yards and the Hudson Park and Boulevard.  The 34th Street station's main entrance, escalators and an elevator on the west side of Hudson Park and Boulevard between 33rd and 34th Streets, is at the foot of 55 Hudson Yards and is just half a block away from the rail yard's northern edge. Another station, planned for Tenth Avenue and 41st Street, was not built.



GARMENT DISTRICT


Garment District


The Garment District, also known as the Garment Center, the Fashion District, or the Fashion Center, is a neighborhood located in the Manhattan borough of New York City. The dense concentration of fashion-related uses give the neighborhood its name. The neighborhood, less than 1 square mile (2.6 km2), is generally considered to lie between Fifth Avenue and Ninth Avenue, from 34th to 42nd Streets.

The neighborhood is home to many of New York City's showrooms and to numerous major fashion labels, and caters to all aspects of the fashion process from design and production to wholesale selling. The Garment District has been known since the early 20th century as the center for fashion manufacturing and fashion design in the United States, and even the world; no other city has a comparable concentration of fashion businesses and talent in a single district.